Nature’s Way Resources

I’ve heard John talk about soil, everything you ever wanted to know about soil he knows and if you get a chance to hear one of his talks don’t miss it.

Nature’s Way sells composts, soils, and every thing you could want for your garden and as of this season plants.

Today is the first chance I had to wander up and check out his nursery. It’s at 1488 and 45, on the east side of 45. 1488 is much easier than 45 if you’re coming from The Woodlands.

If you are looking for shrubs or roses it’s the best and largest collection I’ve seen in any of the local nurseries. While they also have a selection of perennials and annuals, it’s the shrubs and roses that make it worth the trip.

I’ve not run across a better source of information on soil and organic plant growing than the company website.

Blue is for leaves, red is for flowers

The tip of the leaf of a plant senses blue light and signals the plant to grow in the direction of the blue light.

The red glow of a sunset is what signals the plant when it is time to bloom. A plant kept in a dark closet can be signaled to flower with just a short flash of red light.

Plants use both blue and red light to feed themselves but slightly favor red.

Plants appear mostly green because they are reflecting most of the green light that hits them, it doesn’t get used by the plant.

If your plant is not growing well, try adding more blue light. If you’re not getting flowers try more red light.

Is Imprelis herbicide killing your trees?

The NYTimes is reporting that several tree deaths are being linked to the use of the new herbicide Imprelis.

Imprelis uses pyrimidine carboxylic acid (trade name Aptexor )
A recently approved herbicide called Imprelis, widely used by landscapers because it was thought to be environmentally friendly, has emerged as the leading suspect in the deaths of thousands of Norway spruce, eastern white pine and other trees on lawns and golf courses across the country.

Manufactured by DuPont and approved for sale last October by the federal Environmental Protection Agency, Imprelis is used for killing broadleaf weeds like dandelion and clover and is sold to lawn care professionals only. Reports of dying trees started surfacing around Memorial Day, prompting an inquiry by DuPont scientists.

Read more at the NYTimes Story on Imprelis

There have been several reports from both outside and within the state of Michigan of herbicide injury on Norway spruce and white pine following application of the turfgrass herbicide Imprelis (a.i. aminocyclopyrachlor). Damaged trees have symptoms consistent with growth regulator type herbicides. Injury includes curling and twisting of new growth. Pictures and comments of damage observed in Indiana can be viewed at Purdue Extension’s Plant and Pest Diagnostic Laboratory website.

Read more at the Michigan State Extension Office

DuPont is looking into this and recommends that you do not use Imprelis near spruces or white pines for now.

How much fertilizer do transplants need?

In hot humid climates nitrogen is always in short supply. If you, like me, also use pine mark or other mulches that break down rapidly there is even less nitrogen in the soil.

The plants you bring home to your landscape come from a well fed environment. To help them adjust keep up the fertilizer levels for the first six months. Two years later your plants will be stronger and healthier.

If you just use nitrogen as we often do down here the new plants may develop potassium and magnesium deficiencies. So be sure to use a good all around fertilizer.


The roots of container-grown ornamental plants primarily are concentrated within the original container substrate root ball during the establishment period following transplanting into the landscape. Plants growing in container substrates containing pine bark or peatmoss have higher nitrogen (N) requirements than in most landscape soils due to microbial immobilization of N by these organic components. However, use of high-N fertilizers, such as those used in container production of ornamentals, can cause imbalances with potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) when used on palms in sandy landscape soils. Areca palm (Dypsis lutescens) and chinese hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ‘President’) that had been growing in containers were transplanted into a landscape soil to determine if high N fertilization during the establishment period could accelerate the rate of establishment without exacerbating K and Mg deficiencies. Although plants of both species had the darkest green color and largest size when continuously fertilized with high N fertilizer, this treatment did induce Mg deficiency in both species. Plant size and color for both species were highly correlated with cumulative N application rates, but also with initial N application rates, suggesting that high N fertilization during the first 6 months affected plant quality at 12 and 24 months after planting, even if high N fertilization was discontinued. However, continued use of a moderate N landscape palm maintenance fertilizer ultimately produced areca palm plants as good as those receiving high N during the establishment period.

Effects of Fertilization on the Growth and Quality of Container-grown Areca Palm and Chinese Hibiscus during Establishment in the Landscape

Sudden oak death

I’ve lost two oaks to Oak Wilt. Now we may loose more of our oaks to a new threat spreading across from the west coast.

It’s not just oak that are effected, bay laurels, rhododendron and viburnum are also susceptible.

In sudden oak death the leaves at the top die first, canker appear leaking reddish sap, then beetles attack the tree.

Sudden oak death and Phytophthora ramorum, both first recognized about a decade ago, have been the subject of hundreds of scientific and popular press articles. This document presents a comprehensive, concise summary of sudden oak death and P. ramorum research findings and management activities. Topics covered include introduction and background, identification and distribution, the disease cycle, epidemiology and modeling, management and control, and economic and environmental impacts. Sudden oak death and Phytophthora ramorum

Sudden oak death: A threat to Texas Forests

Check plants before you bring them home from the nursery and remove and destroy effected plants.