Sarracenia psittacina aka Parrot pitcher plant

This is a plant I didn’t much like a first, but it has a way of growing on you. The twisted shape and bright red add interest to dish gardens.

First discovered in the mid 1700s, it’s not recorded in detail until ~1800. It is a US carnivorous pitcher plant that grows along the top of the Gulf Coast. It is very similar to the Darlingtonia californica, luring insects with nectar then using a small entrance to trap insects in a long tube. There are downward pointing hairs to keep the insect in should it manage to find the the exit. Eventually the insects drown in the water in the bottom, narrow section of the pitcher.

This is the only known ‘lobster pot’ mechanism for insect capture in carnivorous plants. It’s thought that this allows them to catch prey whether the pitchers are above or below the water.

It grows in the bogs and swamps of pine forests, often submerged, the leaves grow horizontally, so keep it wet and give it lots of light. ( early leaves may grow upright, later leaves getting more horizontal until they are flat so use a wide pot )

There is a moth, Exyra that lives inside the pitcher, feeding on the nectar and not getting eaten.

Does not go dormant in the winter, benefits from occasional habitat fires.

More info:
Sarracenia psittacina, at Botany.org