Giant tree forests need 59″ rain per year to form

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Tree canopies come in two main heights ~82′ and 131′. They form in tropical and temperate regions but only if the yearly rainfall is consistently 59″ or more


Rainforests are among the most charismatic as well as the most endangered ecosystems of the world. However, whereas the effects of climate change on tropical forests resilience is a focus of intense research,the conditions for their equally impressive temperate counterparts remain poorly understood,and it remains unclear whether tropical and temperate rainforests have fundamental similarities or not.Here we use new global data from high precision laser altimetry equipment on satellites to reveal for the first time that across climate zones ‘giant forests’ are a distinct and universal phenomenon, reflected in a separate mode of canopy height (~40m) world-wide. Occurrence of these giant forests (cut-off height > 25 m) is negatively correlated to variability in rainfall and temperature. We also demonstrate that their distribution is sharply limited to situations with a mean annual precipitation above a threshold of 1500 mm that is surprisingly universal across tropical and temperate climates. The total area with such precipitation levels is projected to increase by ~4 million km2globally. Our results thus imply that strategic management could in principle facilitate the expansion of giant forests, securing critically endangered biodiversity as well as carbon storage in selected regions

A Global Climate Niche forGiant Trees