Lepismium Cruciforme Rhipsalis

New cuttings potted up mid April 2018
First flower on the new cuttings
New cuttings getting started
Cuttings in Sept, some progress

This is one of those plants I stumbled across a photo of and I had to have it. Once it gets going it looks like an octopus trying to escape the flower pot.

A green to red rhipsalis with small tufts of white with red flowers along plant. Flowers will become small red fruits. A happy plant can have trailing stems up to 4′ long. This is a hanging rhipsalis, it’ll need to be up high enough to let the branches trail. Fast growing once it gets started.

Water lightly but do not let get dry, water more in warm weather less in cold weather. Pot must have good drainage

Light shade, will burn in direct afternoon sun, loves bright morning sun best

Protect from cold, 55’F, and from heat greater than 80’F

Propagate from cuttings, let end callous over before planting in damp soil

Endangered in natural habitat, Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, so be sure to pass cuttings along to all the gardeners you know

Manfreda maculosa aka Texas Tuberose aka Deciduous Agave

These were relocated last fall, so that haven’t had time to fill out yet. They’ll look much better once there’s a large group of them. The leaf rosettes will fill out to about 3′ and they’ll send up dozens of stalks from each clump in early May (in Houston). Flower stalks are between 4′-6′ tall. Now that they are getting more sun the leaves will become speckled with purple.

They prefer well-drained soil and are drought tolerant once established.

Native to south eastern Texas through North east Mexica, often found growing wild

Propagate by division and seed

28 known species

Named after an Italian writer, Manfredus de Monte Imperiale

problems: Really hates being wet, plant some where dry and sunny

Papaver rhoeas aka Poppies

You see these often in Austin, it’s a bit too warm for them in Houston. They bloom in March each year. Poppies are annual but will reseed themselves. If you are purchasing seeds plant them in the fall after it gets chilly.

Seeds will survive in the soil for years, plants appear when the soil is disturbed exposing the seeds to some light. This is why they were so commonly seen near the trenches of WWI

Poppies produce prodigious amounts of pollen making them a great addition to a bee garden.

Native to Africa, extensively found throughout Middle East and the colder parts of Europe